Iron Rich Vegetarian Diet Menu
Diet Menu

Iron Rich Vegetarian Diet Menu

Iron Rich Vegetarian Diet Menu – Iron Rich is a substance that cannot be produced by the body, iron can only be produced from foods that are consumed.

Our bodies cannot produce iron on their own, so it must be obtained through food or supplements. Iron is an essential nutrient needed to produce red blood cells. If you are deficient in iron, you can develop anemia or lack of blood.

Written in a report in the Journal of Research in Medical Sciences in 2014, iron can be found in two forms, namely heme and non-heme. Heme iron is found in animal foods, while non-heme iron is obtained from plant-based sources.

The recommended daily dietary allowance (RDA) for iron is based on an average intake of 18 mg per day. However, these needs can vary, depending on the gender and stage of life of a person.

For example, postmenopausal men and women usually need 8 mg of iron per day. This amount increases to 18 mg per day for women who are menstruating, and to 27 mg per day for pregnant women.

1. Dark chocolate

Dark chocolate is not only delicious, but also high in iron. In a serving, about 100 grams, contains 35 percent of the daily RDA for iron. You can include dark chocolate in your daily diet in moderation.

2. Red rice

This healthy source of complex carbohydrates is also high in iron. A cup of red rice can meet 70 percent of the daily RDA for iron, which can also help the body prevent and fight anemia.

In addition, the content of B vitamins in brown rice can also help prevent fatigue.

Brown rice is also rich in fiber, so that it can be filling and full for a long time. You can make it the main source of carbohydrates in your daily diet.

3. Cooked spinach

Launching the Vegetarian Times, raw spinach contains oxalic acid, an organic compound that can interfere with the absorption of important nutrients such as calcium and iron. Oxalic acid binds to calcium, making it unavailable to the body. High consumption of oxalic acid can make a person suffer from nutritional deficiencies.

The good news is, oxalic acid can be broken down when heated. That is why you are advised to cook spinach, for example, stir-fry it briefly or turn it into clear vegetables.

Cooked spinach contains 2.5-6.4 mg of iron per cup, or 14-36 percent of the recommended daily RDA for iron.

Apart from spinach, other vegetables that are also known to be high in iron are kale, Swiss chard, and beet greens.

Also Read:Health Benefits of Gluten Diet

4. Dried fruit

Dried fruit contains more iron per serving than fresh fruit because it is concentrated. In one cup or about 130 grams contains 3-4 mg of iron.

Launching My Food Data, dried fruit that is high in iron is dried peaches, which contain 36 percent of the recommended daily RDA for iron. In second place are prunes and dried currants, which can meet 26 percent of the daily RDA for iron.

5. Nuts

Widely consumed by people on both a vegetarian and vegan diet, legumes are a food that is low in calories, high in fiber, high in protein, and other vitamins and minerals.

Keep in mind that boiling or roasting nuts may reduce their nutrition. So, if possible, choose nuts that can be consumed raw.

You can also consume peanut butter, but choose products that are 100 percent natural and avoid products with added oil, sugar, and salt.